Updating bt home hub

02-Jul-2018 16:54

Many BT customers are complaining that the setup procedure for the smart wireless speaker, which should be relatively straightforward, is running into issues when trying to connect to a wireless network created by the BT Home Hub router.

If you're having trouble connecting the Amazon Echo or Echo Dot to your BT Home Hub's Wi-Fi, then read on to find out what you can do to fix those problems and get it up and running.

In the Echo's Wireless Network setup screen in the app, type in the name of your BT Home Hub network and the password you use to allow devices to connect to the network.

Next, click on 'Advanced settings' and select the security setting to use.

Now enter in the following details in the correct text boxes: IP address: 192.168.1.2Router: 192.168.1.254Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0DNS 1: 81.1DNS 2: 81.1Your Echo should now connect to your network.

We previously suggested using the following DNS addresses: DNS 1: 62.6.40.178DNS 2: 62.6.40.162However, BT has contacted to let us know that these are legacy addresses that will be decommissioned in the next few weeks, so we recommend using the new DNS addresses.

updating bt home hub-23updating bt home hub-5updating bt home hub-45updating bt home hub-72

So IPv6 is the new network standard that has an effectively unlimited number of addresses and will support an unlimited number of devices.With Amazon and Microsoft enabling IPv6 in stages on their public clouds by default traffic will continue to grow.Already for a some number of ISPs, IPv6 is the dominant protocol.The problem is associated with using DNS 8.8.8.8 as well as BT parental controls.Did you recently buy an Amazon Echo in the Black Friday or Cyber Monday sales?

So IPv6 is the new network standard that has an effectively unlimited number of addresses and will support an unlimited number of devices.

With Amazon and Microsoft enabling IPv6 in stages on their public clouds by default traffic will continue to grow.

Already for a some number of ISPs, IPv6 is the dominant protocol.

The problem is associated with using DNS 8.8.8.8 as well as BT parental controls.

Did you recently buy an Amazon Echo in the Black Friday or Cyber Monday sales?

Both companies are suffering exhaustion of private RFC1918 address space – there just aren’t enough 10.a.b.c addresses to cope with organisations of their scale so they’re moving now to IPv6-only networks.